As with headaches and migraines caused by other conditions, people find a variety of ways to try to alleviate the unpleasant symptoms of Barometric Pressure Headaches. What helps one person may not help another, but here is a list of things that are noted to help some people:

  • Laying down flat.
  • Laying down with head and neck sightly elevated. Beds that can be raised and adjusted can be very handy.
  • Some people become very sensitive to the sensations of light, sound, heat and odour. They often find relief in a cool, quiet, darkened room free from strong odours.
  • Avoid becoming dehydrated and drink regularly.
  • Too little or too much sleep has been found to trigger headaches in some people. However, sleeping is nature’s healer and most headache sufferers instinctively seek relief and oblivion from pain by trying to sleep. Aside from allowing the body to repair itself, many headache sufferers find that their headache symptoms are better after sleeping; in part due to having experienced deep relaxation, lowering of blood pressure and reduced vasodilation in the head, as well as a possible reduction in headache associated electrical brain activity.
  • Be aware of other migraine and headache triggers (not directly attributable to barometric pressure/weather) that some people are sensitive to. They can include one or more of the following:
    • Certain foods and drinks :
      • Chocolate, monosodium glutamate, citrus fruits, dairy products and cheese.
      • Alcohol, especially red wine.
      • Skipping meals can also act as a trigger for some people.
    • Caffeine – despite being commonly used in migraine medication, some people report that it can trigger their migraines. Similarly, some people find an excess or withdrawal of caffeine is a migraine trigger.
    • Changing sleep patterns.
    • Fatigue – both physical or mental.
    • Hormonal factors including HRT, birth control pill and menstruation.
    • Particular or excessive noise, scents, lights (including flickering light and light from flourescent tubes).
    • Stress and allergies.
  • People report that simple things such as avoiding stuffy rooms by opening a window i.e. increasing oxygen levels (the brain responds to depleted oxygen levels by dilating blood vessels to ensure oxygen supply. Vasodilation can exert pressure on parts of the brain and cause headaches) and reducing the possible build up of carbon monoxide.
  • A brisk walk outdoors (particularly by a source of water such as a river or waterfall) and aerobic exercise raises certain chemicals in the body that can help dull a headache:
    • Endorphins are the body’s natural pain killers and interact with opiate receptors to reduce the perception of pain and also enhance one’s sense of well-being.
    • Serotonin is often referred to as a ‘happy’ hormone. It is categorized as a neurotransmitter and influences one’s overall sense of well-being as well as acting as a vasoconstrictor.